More housing for people with acquired brain injuries| A Place to Call Home
Skip to main content
Transcript

(Music fades in.)

(Visual: A wide landscape shot of a small city appears. Smokestacks are seen in the distance among the hills of the landscape. Sudbury’s famous Canadian nickel is revealed through the leaves of the trees.)

(Text on screen: Sudbury, ON)

(Visual: A wide panning shot of the city shown. As the camera pans, homes among Autumn leaves can be seen lining the streets. A car drives down a residential street. The Vandeligt residence, a red brick bungalow, is revealed. A small dog rests on the back porch of the home. The camera cuts to the interior of the home. Ken’s childhood bedroom is shown. A few teddy bears sit on top of a wardrobe. A hospital bed sits in the middle of the room. There are numerous framed photos hanging on the walls of the room. The camera cuts to a number of old pictures of Ken, including his high school graduation photo, a photo of him socializing with a group of friends, and photo of him on a dirt bike.)

00:13
This is the Vandeligt residence. We moved here when Ken was 3 months old, and he’s 39 right now. So, we’ve been here a long time. It was August 14th, 2004. He went over to a friend’s house. They were just having a get together and he took another friend’s quad out for a ride.

(Visual: Joe-Ann Vandeligt, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed inside Ken’s childhood room.)

(Text on screen: Joe-Ann Vandeligt, Ken’s Mother)

00:36
When he didn’t come back, they went to check on him and they found out that he had had an accident. He was passed out. We didn’t know what the outcome was going to be. It was deemed catastrophic.

(Visual: More old photos of Ken are shown, including an image of him holding up two fish, and an image of him holding a trophy and pair up skis at a ski hill. The camera cuts to a photograph of a lighthouse with an inspirational message that says: Goals - A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.)

00:48
I was devastated, like… I didn’t know what we were going to do. March of Dimes was probably the best contact I made when I was in the hospital.
(Visual: Joe-Ann Vandeligt, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed inside Ken’s childhood room.)

00:59
I met with a person who met with Ken also, and just asked what our needs were, and they were looking at building a home for people with acquired brain injuries.

(Visual: A wide angle shot pans across the Wade Hampton House. The medium shot of the front door of the Wade Hampton House is shown. The camera slowly moves through the main hallway of the facility.)

01:09
So, we’ve been a service provider supporting individuals with acquired brain injuries…

(Visual: Deanna Chisholm-Tullio, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed in the common area of the Wade Hampton House.)

(Text on screen: Deanna Chisholm-Tullio, Regional Director - North East District
March of Dimes Canada)

01:14
… for nearly 25 years here in the North East. And as we provided service, we certainly recognized…

(Visual: Ken is shown moving through the halls in his wheelchair at the Wade Hampton House. The camera cuts to the common kitchen area of the facility where staff is shown chatting and preparing food. The camera moves through a homey looking TV room with comfortable couches and a bookshelf filled with DVDs. The camera pans across a fitness area in the facility.)

01:19
… some of the individuals being referred to us needed a higher level of support to be successful with community living. So, they needed a setting that was staffed 24 hours, but still allowed them to focus on rehabilitation, making gains as a result of their injury that they received.

(Visual: The camera cuts to Ken entering his bedroom at the Wade Hampton House. The camera cuts between a series of close up shots featuring items in Ken’s room including a trophy that says, “Survivor Awards”, a framed picture of classic cars, and model of a motorcycle. Ken is shown in the middle of his room near his bed. The camera cuts to a close image shot of Ken’s calendar. Ken’s room is full of car and tractor related artwork and merchandise.)

01:37
August 5th, 2011 is the date that the Wade Hampton House was opened up. Ken has his own room. He’s encouraged to direct his own care. He can set his schedules. What he chooses to wear. What his outings are. What he wants to eat.

(Visual: Joe-Ann Vandeligt, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed inside Ken’s childhood room.)

01:55
You know, he’s continuing to progress because they won’t let you give up.

(Visual: Close up image of Ken’s face as he looks around his room.)

02:00
They work with people every day.

(Visual: A close up image of a body diagram is shown on the wall of the facility fitness room. Ken enters to fitness room with his mother. He begins an arm exercise on a strength conditioning machine.)

02:03
I think one of things as staff we’re most proud of is that ability to work intensely with an individual.

(Visual: Deanna Chisholm-Tullio, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed in the common area of the Wade Hampton House.)

02:09
So, I think without settings like this it’s very hard for individuals to see their maximum potential.

(Visual: Ken is shown looking at his iPad while seated in the common area of the facility. On the iPad, Ken is revealed to be playing a race car video game.)

02:14
Ken is a great example of someone that’s very driven, motivated. He has a great personality. He fits in well. We’ve been fortunate to work with him and have him as part of this home environment.

(Visual: Ken and his mother are shown sitting side-by-side in the common area of the facility. Ken begins to speak with some assistance from his mother.)

(Text on screen: Ken Vandeligt, Resident – Wade Hampton House)

02:25
Ken: I like when the WIFI is good.
Joe-Ann: He said he likes it when the Wi-Fi is good. There was some problems this summer before they changed providers. Ken’s on his iPad all the time. But what else do you like?
Ken: I love the food.
Joe-Ann: You love the food?
Ken: Yeah. I love it here. I love... my freedom.
Joe-Ann: Your what? My freedom?
Ken: Yeah. I like…
Joe-Ann: You like…
Ken: …living here.
Joe-Ann: …living here.

(Visual: Joe-Ann Vandeligt, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed inside Ken’s childhood room.)

03:07
He realizes that things will never be the way they were, and he’s accepted that.

(Visual: Old photos of Ken hang on the wall in his room. The photo frame says “BELIEVE”. The camera cuts to a close up shot of the hand controls of Ken’s wheelchair., A close up of a tattoo on Ken’s forearm says “Never Surrender” as the camera slowly tilts upward to reveal Ken’s happy face looking around his room.)

03:14
He’s accepted that he’s had this accident and he takes life one day at a time and he says life is what you make it. So, he’s very positive. I worry about what’s going to happen to Ken if he outlives me…

(Visual: Joe-Ann Vandeligt, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed inside Ken’s childhood room.)

03:29
… so, him being there is a relief, because I know that he’ll be taken care of.

(Visual: The camera shifts focus from an ornamental sign that says “HOPE” in the background of Ken’s bedroom to Ken’s face in the foreground of the frame. The camera cuts to an exterior shot that reveals the Wade Hampton House.)

03:26
He’s not going to be forgotten. I’m just so thankful for March of Dimes and the Wade Hampton House. It’s a blessing.

(Visual: Deanna Chisholm-Tullio, the woman speaking, appears on camera. She is facing the camera and is being interviewed in the common area of the Wade Hampton House.)

03:44
Without the investment in housing, we wouldn’t have the opportunity…

(Visual: Exterior tracking shot of the new housing facility built beside the original Wade Hampton House. The camera cuts to the interior of the new facility that is undergoing construction. A wide angle shot pans across the common area of the building. An accessible kitchen and bathroom are shown in one of the independent units available in the facility. The camera cuts back to a wide angle shot of Ken in his room. His arm is raised in triumph as he smiles and looks around his room. The image slowly fades to white as text and logos appear.)

03:48
…to give these individuals the potential to live in the community, continue to work on goals within their rehab. So, with the new setting, again will support another 12 individuals that are living with a complex brain injury. These types of settings help us to kind of facilitate people to be the best they can be every day and live well.

(Text on screen: #NationalHousingStrategy, placetocallhome.ca)
(Music fades out)
(Visual: Text, the National Housing Strategy logo, Government of Canada logo, and CMHC logo fade in together. All text and logos fade to white.) 

Share this story

January 6, 2020

Housing facility helps more people with acquired brain injuries

Joe-Ann’s life changed forever the day her son crashed an ATV. Ken almost lost his life. He had suffered a catastrophic brain injury that placed him in a coma.

“I was devastated,” says Joe-Ann. “We didn’t know what the outcome would be. Ken was in the hospital for a long time.”

Joe-Ann and her family waited weeks for Ken to wake. When he finally did, the long and arduous road to recovery began. Ken had lost control of many of his motor functions. For several years, he struggled to make progress. That is, until he moved into March of Dimes Canada’s Wade Hampton House.

“March of Dimes was probably the best contact I made while I was in the hospital,” says Joe-Ann.

She credits Ken’s incredible recovery to the support he received at his new home.

Joe-Ann explains, “Ken has his own room. He’s encouraged to direct his own care. He continues to progress because they won’t let you give up.”

The Wade Hampton House provides affordable assisted living for people with an Acquired Brain Injury or ABI. The facility’s full-time on-site services and supports accommodate residents with a range of needs.

“We could see the need for this type of housing,” states Deanna Chisholm-Tullio, regional director for the North East District with March of Dimes Canada. “I think one of the things we are most proud of is that ability to work intensely with an individual. Ken is a great example of someone that is very driven and motivated. We’ve been fortunate to work with him and have him as part of this home environment.”

Now, a long-anticipated expansion will enable them to help an additional 12 people living with a complex brain injury.

There will be 6 rooms with a shared, supportive living space as well as 6 one-bedroom apartments for residents who can live more independently.

On-site services will aim to help residents regain skills and learn new ones. The facility’s open and supportive environment will help residents become a part of a new community.

“For those living with a disability it is important we provide them the best quality of life we can,” says Deanna. “Investing in housing is key to that.”

The expansion of the Wade Hampton House is funded by the National Housing Co-Investment Fund , a National Housing Strategy initiative.

 See what actions we are taking in response to COVID-19.